The 2014 Institute for Social Change

The month of August marked the end of my spring-summer work as the coordinator and co-planner* of the 2014 Arts of Citizenship Institute for Social Change at Rackham. The goal of the four-day institute was to introduce socially motivated graduate students in the humanities and humanistic social sciences at Michigan to the conceptual and practical dimensions of engaged public scholarship. The institute comprised thematic panels, public engagement workshops, and site visits with scholars, practitioners, community members, and relevant public officials—all structured around such questions as: What does it mean to practice engaged public scholarship within the academy? What are the politics of producing work in public and for a public audience? How might we integrate community work over the arc of our lives as academics and as professionals?

The 22 students at the Institute came from 15 graduate units on campus. The four faculty-student engagement groups that emerged from their letters of interests were: arts and culture collaborations; community-based research; engaged pedagogy; and public narratives. I have curated highlights from the Institute into a Twitter collection entitled, ACISC2014. My involvement in this project and its ongoing life will continue through F14 and W15 semesters. For more information on the Arts of Citizenship program at the University of Michigan, see: http://artsofcitizenship.umich.edu/

* With Matthew Countryman, Faculty Director of Arts of Citizenship and Associate Professor of History and American Culture at U-M.

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